Livable shelters become increasingly popular as more of us travel, providing an easily-constructed shelter in remote places. Especially useful in areas that are difficult to develop, these structures can add a sense of home-away-from-home while hiking or backpacking. One such shelter is the Huba Mountain Shelter by Michael Holcer.

Mountain shelter

Mountain shelter

While these shelters are most popular with travelers, like the Mini House or Vipp Shelter, they can also be used in rescue and refugee situations, like Safe Box. Specifically made to be transportable, prefabricated shelters offer house-like protection against the elements while also being moveable when the situation calls for it.

Huba would be air-dropped on the mountain

Huba would be air-dropped on the mountain

 

Mountainous ranges are a nearly impossible climate in which to create infrastructure, both because of the changing landscape and because of the fierce elements. Between the wind, rain, and snow, structures would not last long and are therefore not worth investing in. Holcer believes that prefabricated shelters would be better to build in these areas because they are not meant to be permanent.

A safe place to sleep

A safe place to sleep

Prefabricated modular homes can be beautiful, sturdy houses like those from LivingHomes or Method Homes. Holcer envisions something smaller and more humble for the mountains, more like the prefabricated sheds from Shed USA or Studio Shed – but still quite livable. Huba would have bunk-like beds built into the walls in which travelers could sleep safely.

Huba's power system

Huba’s power system uses wind energy

Huba would also have a “chimney” equipped with a wind turbine, providing green power to the shelter via a battery. Travelers would then have heat, light, and a pump. The power equipment would be built separately from the shelter, then pieced together when the shelter is placed. This would allow them to be separated and repaired as need be.

Huba's materials have low environmental impact

Huba’s materials have low environmental impact

Holcer suggests the structure by made of the wood from already fallen trees, meaning low cost and no ecological impact. The power turbine would be made from recycled plastic, using a process called rotomoulding. The roof tiles are made to funnel water to a tank inside the cabin.

A beautiful cabin in the mountains

A beautiful cabin in the mountains

Both ecologically safe and sustainable (not to mention portable) Huba would be perfect for mountainous areas that attract many visitors. We hope to see these shelters in production soon, but until then check out the designer’s website to learn more about this and other great ideas.

 

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