Most Bluetooth and digital speakers have the sleek albeit stereotypical design, which can look quite beautiful. But for those who prefer a more natural look, materials like wood are greatly appreciated. That’s why designer SaeJoung Kou created the ingenious soundBarrel speaker, which is not only made of wood but also features a fascinating way to emit sound; by using the same methods as a camera lens, its iris opens and closes like a shutter to regulate the sound coming through and provide a truly unique listening experience.

Shutter for sound

Shutter for sound

Bluetooth speakers, like the Bose Mini Bluetooth speakers or the Sony portable wireless Bluetooth speakers, are an excellent way to have great music and sound capability in a portable setting. This makes it easier to listen to music whether you’re at home or traveling. Most of these speakers have an ultra-modern, metallic sort of look that alludes to their sleekness, like the RIVA Turbo X available at Crutchfield. soundBarrel seeks to differ from this look by using beautiful wood grains in the basswood material and brushed metals, for a natural and earthy look.

Natural look

Natural look

Not only is its look more natural, but its sound is designed to be so as well. The designer has created the iris diaphragm inside, which controls the sound emitting from the resonator, calling it “sound aperture” since it is similar to the light aperture used by cameras. Since it is made of wood, it also provides amazing acoustics for a¬†very rich and real sound.

Interactive features

Interactive features

With an interactive interface, sustainable material, and portable size of 3.7″ in diameter, this speaker would look great sitting on your shelf, table, dresser, etc. Still in the design/prototype stage, it will be interesting to see if its process is furthered after the designer graduates to begin a professional career.

Made of basswood and brushed metals

Made of basswood and brushed metals

Check out SaeJoung’s website to learn more about the creative process of soundBarrel.

 

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